Vitamin B5 Pantothenic acid


Pantothenic acid, also called vitamin B5, is a water-soluble vitamin required to sustain life. Pantothenic acid is needed to form coenzyme-A (CoA), and is critical in the metabolism and synthesis of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats.

Its name is derived from the Greek pantothen meaning "from everywhere" and small quantities of pantothenic acid are found in nearly every food, with high amounts in whole grain cereals, legumes, eggs, meat, and royal jelly.

It is commonly found as its alcohol analog, the provitamin panthenol, and as calcium pantothenate. The dimeric form Pantethine is considered to be the more active form of the vitamin in the body, but is unstable at high temperatures or when stored for long periods, so calcium pantothenate is the more usual form of vitamin B5 when it is sold as a dietary supplement.

Another form of pantothenic acid called panthoderm is added to skin creams and lotions for soothing cuts, scrapes, and mild burns (some believe that Vitamin B5 helps wounds heal more quickly by stimulating the cells to grow).

Pantothenic acid deficiency is exceptionally rare and has not been thoroughly studied. In the few cases where deficiency has been seen (victims of starvation and limited volunteer trials), nearly all symptoms can be reversed with the return of pantothenic acid.

Symptoms of deficiency are similar to other vitamin B deficiencies. Most are minor, including fatigue, allergies, nausea, and abdominal pain. In a few rare circumstances more serious (but reversible) conditions have been seen, such as adrenal insuffiency and hepatic encephalopathy.

Gopalan's Burning Foot Syndrome Severe Burning of the sole with lightening pain was reported in tests conducted on volunteers.